Transitioning to ELD from AOBRD

On December 16, 2019, any driver still running an AOBRD will be in violation of the electronic logging device (ELD) law. It’s important all users understand the difference between the two so they know what to expect.

An Electronic Logging Device is electronic hardware that’s connected to the OBD port of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). The ELD records hours of service (HOS), driving time, miles driven, and engine information. Because the ELD is attached to the CMV it doesn’t have to be turned on for it to collect data. However, the user must log on their ELD app to record the correct status such as on duty and off duty, and personal conveyance. An Automatic On-board Recording Device (AOBRD) functions similar to an ELD but AOBRDs allow drivers and fleets the opportunity to correct mistakes on logs. It also displays less information, making corrections less apparent. In comparison, ELDs displays all annotations, and automatically recorded events cannot be edited only annotated by the admin.

If you use Ezlogz, you can switch from AOBRD to ELD with the click of a button. However, with other carriers it may be a more painful process and you might find yourself searching the market for a new FMCSA-compliant ELD.

This is what founder and CEO of Ezlogz, CJ “Sergey” Karman, has to say about the transition from AOBRD to ELD, “Taking into consideration the new HOS law expecting to be published next month, the transition should be smooth, I can see it benefiting the logistics industry.” CJ concluded, “Because Ezlogz is the first ELD provider on blockchain technology, with tamper proof, imputable, and transparent ELD data our customers will be at ease with the process.” We’re anticipating the new HOS law expected next month. Hopefully it will encourage drivers with AOBRD to make the switch sooner than the deadline.

The table below compares how both AOBRD and ELD records data, locations, editing, and driving time. This table summarizes the FMCSA’s comparison chart.

AOBRDELD
What it records:

-Date and Time
-Engine hours
-Vehicle miles
-Drive times
-Locations
-Duty status
-Date and Time
-Engine hours
-Vehicle Miles
-Locations
-Duty status
-Vehicle malfunctions
-Identifying information
on driver, carrier & vehicle
Locations:

-Can be entered
manually
-Recorded at change
of duty status
Automatically records when:
-Engine is turned off or on
-Change in duty status
-60 min intervals while
driving
Editing:

-Records who made an
edit and when
-Automatically recorded
events cannot be edited
only annotated
Driving time:

-Can only be edited
when attributed to
the wrong driver
-Automatically records when
vehicle reaches 5mph
Inspections:

-Not required to print
out logs
-Must transfer data to
officials by web, email, or
bluetooth
-If transfer not available, the
ELD must display or print
out the logs

S

Source: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/faq/what-are-differences-specs-1988-aobrd-rule-and-eld-rule

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